Diaspora’s Children: A New Work by Stan Rushworth

 
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“When the eyes of my heart look into the eyes of your heart, and see only good, and the eyes of your heart look into the eyes of my heart, and see only good, then we can talk.“                                  —Diaspora’s Children 

On Talk of the Bay, Tuesday, October 27, 2020 Christine Barrington welcomes author Stan Rushworth onto the show to talk about his new book Diaspora’s Children.

“This collection of stories, reflection and prayers

is a survival manual

a way to remember that serves the heart,

written where PTSD and PCSD (Post Colonial Stress Disorder) dovetail.

And in this thinking, I want to

remove the word “Post” from both,

because they continue.

They don’t go away.

They keep circling around.” 

 

Stan Rushworth has been a Professor of Native American Literature at Cabrillo College for nearly three decades. Raised within both a native and European heritage, Stan is a citizen of the Chiricahua Apache Nation. He describes this book as a “survival manual,” because he needed to write in order to survive and transform the relationship to his haunting and traumatic memories from serving in the Vietnam War, as well as growing up as a Native American in the United States. These stories woven into a affecting whole from Stan Rushworth’s rich life experiences are haunting, painful, and ultimately beautiful in their service to life and healing.

This is a book full of fierce compassion. You may find it fiercely loving, fiercely truthful and fiercely life changing–if its story can land in your heart and in its chambers take flight.

Diaspora’s Children is a Talking Leaves book that came out this month from Hand to Hand publishing.